Rosewood History ©

Westvale Colliery 4th June 1938

ACCIDENTS IN LOCAL MINES

Timothy Hayes 8 /10/1885 – Walloon.
Killed. Falling down a shaft 133 feet in depth. Son of Patrick Hayes & Margaret nee Murphy.
MAN KILLED AT WALLOON. A fatal accident happened at the Walloon Coal-mine, on Thursday last, to a young man named. Timothy Hayes, a new arrival. It appears that the proprietors of the mine are sinking a shaft to the depth of 200ft., and are now down something like 133ft. Hayes was employed in receiving and emptying buckets on the top as they arrived, being drawn up by the engine.

All went well until Thursday, when Hayes gave the signal to lower the bucket which was above him, so as to give him time to run the safety trolly over the shaft, which covers the whole of the shaft mouth, and to place a smaller one on top of that to receive the bucket. Through some misjudgment of his own, instead of placing the bucket fairly, he put it too much on one side. It’s canting and his trying to rectify it, all being on one side of the safety trolly. caused this to move, and leave a gap for the unfortunate fellow to fall through. There were two miners working below at the time, and, hearing the rush of water from above, they moved to a secure place, when, to their horror, they saw the lifeless body. The engineer having blown the alarm-whistle, no time was lost in bringing the body to the surface, and wiring information to the head police station at Ipswich.

A telegram was sent from the police in Ipswich to the officer in charge at Rosewood, instructing him to obtain a magistrate’s order for burial, to have an inquiry instituted, and to communicate with the Inspector of Mines. Hayes had been employed on the works for about seven weeks, and, being a steady and industrious young man, soon made many friends.. Work was at once suspended, and will continue so until Monday, as a token of respect for the deceased, as well as to allow the miners and others to attend his funeral, which took place yesterday, at 3 p.m., and was largely attended.
[Queensland Times, Ipswich Herald and General Advertiser, Saturday, 10 October 1885, page 7]

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4/2/1893 – Seven men drowned in the Eclipse Colliery disaster.
ECLIPSE COLLIERY DISASTER – One of the most lamentable occurrences in connection with the unprecedented flood is undoubtedly that which happened at the Eclipse Colliery, at Tivoli, commonly know as Mr. John Wright’s. On Saturday morning last there seemed very little likelihood of the water surrounding the pit in the morning, and the men, from what we have been able to learn, went down into the workings. The water, however, subsequently rose with such remark-able rapidity that the mine was very soon flooded; Seven miners were drowned, their names being Thomas Wright (family of three), George Wright (one in family), Patrick McQuade (four in family), John McQuade (son of the last named), Matthew Culbertson (family of eight), Armand Smart (four in family), and Charles Walker (family of seven). Five other men who were down the mine at the time fortunately escaped with their lives. 

Patrick M’Carthy, one of the survivors, said: I was not permanently employed at the mine. On Saturday morning Mr. Wright sent a little boy to my place, and also to my brother’s, to ask us to come and assist the men already employed at the mine. Mr. Wright instructed my brother, me, and Ted to go to a tunnel and remove rails. There was not a great quantity of water in this tunnel, and we did not consider it to be dangerous. When we had been at work for about 20 minutes the slip occurred, and my brother gave the alarm, and we managed escape with some difficulty. We were completely exhausted when we reached the top. To tell the truth, I hardly know how I got up, for the tunnel, when we were scrambling out, was like an exploded gun. We had no lights, our lamps having been blown out. My brother’s hands were cut with gravel and debris which were sent up the tunnel. The narrator, pointing to some holes in the ground, said that they had been dug by the sorrowing women whose husbands were underneath.
[Telegraph, Saturday, 11 February 1893, page 3]

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John Rea 1894 – Caledonian (Walloon)
Injured. Fractured arm. Caught by wire rope when unwinding it from the drum.

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George Towson 17/12/1898 – Walloon
Injured. Struck on elbow.
ACCIDENT AT A COAL MINE. A young man named George Towson, aged 19 years, a miner, employed at the Walloon Colliery, was admitted into the Ipswich Hospital on Saturday, suffering from a wound on the right elbow. The injury resulted from his being accidentally struck on the elbow with a pick used by a miner working next to him. The injury was attended to, and the patient is now doing well.
[Queensland Times, Ipswich Herald and General Advertiser, Tuesday 20 December 1898, page 4]

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Henry Appleton 17/11/1900 – Walloon
Died 18/12/1900. Son of John Appleton and Ann nee Haswell. Back injured (fatal). Fall of stone. Sufferer had taken down top coal and commenced to work in face, when a piece of stone fell on him.
SERIOUS ACCIDENT AT WALLOON – Another mining accident occurred on Saturday morning, this time at Walloon (about four miles from Ipswich), when a man named Henry Appleton met with very serious injuries. A quantity of earth and stone became dislodged from the roof of one of the mines and fell on top of Appleton, who was working underneath. Dr. Flynn was immediately sent for, and he attended to tho man’s injuries. Appleton was then conveyed by train to Ipswich and taken to the hospital in the ambulance litter. The unfortunate man was found to be suffering from a fractured spine and other injuries from the lower part of his body upwards. Appleton is 42 years of age, and is a married man with several children. He resides at Bundamba, and had been working at the mine at Walloon for only about three weeks
[Brisbane Courier, Monday 19 November 1900, page 6]

THE WALLOON MINING FATALITY – Today Mr. H. T. Macfarlane, Mining Warden, sat at the Ipswich Police Court to Inquire into-the circumstances attending .the death of Henry Appleton, a miner, who died in the Ipswich Hospital on the 18th. December from Injuries received by him when working at the Caledonian mine, Walloon., Messrs. J. Richards, A. Binnie, J. Morris, and W. Morris acted as assessors, and the inquiry was conducted by Mr. W. Fryar, Government Inspector. The evidence of William Stephenson, the manager of the mine, Arthur Richardson, who was working with the deceased at the time, of the occurrence, and George Hunter, a miner who helped to rescue Appleton went to show that the man was working in a tunnel when he iras crushed by a fall of stone from the roof, and sustained fracture of the spine, with injury to the spinal cord, causing paralysis of the lower part of tho body. His condition was hopeless, and he died at the hospital. The evidence disclosed the fact that the tunnel had been properly inspected before the men went to work, and that deceased’s mate had himself tested the roof before starting. The finding of the court was that Appleton was killed by a fall of stone from a “slip” which was accidental, and that no blame be attached to anyone.
[Brisbane Courier, Tuesday, 29 January 1901, page 6]

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William Davis 9/12/1901 – Caledonian (Walloon)
Injured. Flesh wounds. Fall of coal etc. A small band of stone which separates the bands of coal fell, striking sufferer’s brow.
MINING ACCIDENT AT WALLOON. A miner named William Davis, employed at Walloon, was injured through a fall of stone yesterday. It seems that he had only been at work about half-an-hour when a big lump of the material became detached from the roof and struck him above the eye, inflicting a large and very ugly lacerated wound which let the eyebrow right dawn over the eye. He was brought to Ipswich and admitted to the Hospital, where he is now under treatment.
[Queensland Times, Ipswich Herald and General Advertiser, Tuesday, 10 December 1901, page 4]

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Charles William Carey 19/06/1902 – Caledonian (Walloon)
Injured. Leg broken. Slipped when uncoupling trucks.
ACCIDENT AT THE WALLOON MINES – Mr. C. W. CAREY, a workman employed at the pit-head at the Caledonian coal mine, Walloon, met with a nasty accident on Thursday last. It appears that he was shifting some trucks at the pit-head, and had uncoupled the first one, when the others collided with it, crushing him so severely that his left leg was broken. He was brought to Ipswich and admitted into the Hospital late in the afternoon. He is now progressing very satisfactorily.
[Queensland Times, Ipswich Herald and General Advertiser, Saturday, 21 June 1902, page 9]

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George Hodgson Towson 19/01/1904 – Caledonian (Walloon)
Killed. Fall of stone in face of room. Son of Robert Towson and Euphemia Grieve nee Rutherford
FATAL MINING ACCIDENT – A regrettable accident occurred at the Caledonian. Coal-mine, Walloon, on Tuesday morning, resulting in the death of a married man named George Towson. From the meagre particulars we have been able to glean, it appears that a quantity of earth fell on the unfortunate man, causing a compound fracture of his.skull. A telegram was sent to Ipswich for surgical aid, but, on the arrival of the doctor summoned, he found life to be extinct. The deceased leaves a widow and one child. [Queensland Times, Ipswich Herald and General Advertiser, Thursday 21 January 1904, page 4]

Magisterial Inquiry 

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Wilhelm Karl Gottfried Federer  6/05/1905 – Caledonian.
Killed. When wedging down some top coal, some of the roof came away from a cutter. Son of Eberhard Federer and Albertine nee Klewe.
FATAL COLLIERY ACCIDENT AT WALLOON – A fatal accident occurred at the Caledonian Colliery, Walloon, on Saturday last, the victim being a miner named William C. E. Federer, aged 26 years. It appears that he was working in a room by himself, and at about 9 o’clock his wheeler, a youth named Michael McGrath, who had just taken away a full truck of coal, returned to call him to breakfast.

Meantime a miner, working in the next room, heard a fall. and mentally remarked, ” That will save someone a lot of trouble.’ On entering the room, however, Federer was found lying dead, pinned under a fall of stone weighing three or for tons. We understand that he had been previously informed that the place was dangerous. Death was instantaneous, the skull of the deceased being fractured, and Dr. Von Lossberg, Government health officer, who was summoned, gave the necessary certificate.

The deceased leaves a widow and two children. His funeral, which took place on Sunday, was very largely attended. Mr. R. Hunter, district inspector of mines, has since made an inspection of the place. A magisterial inquiry concerning the fatality will be held in due course.
[Queensland Times, Ipswich Herald and General Advertiser, Tuesday 9 May 1905, page 9]

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William Harrold 18/05/1906 – Caledonian Colliery (Walloon)
Injured. Jammed his fingers when tipping a wagon.

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James Stirling  28/11/1906 – Caledonian (Walloon)
Injured. A piece of roof fell, injuring one hand.
ACCIDENTS – Yesterday, whilst working in the Caledonian Colliery at Walloon, Mr. Jas. Stirling, 40 years of ago, a married man, received an injury to the back of his right hand as the result of a fall of stone. He came to Ipswich, and preceded to the ambulance station, at North Ipswich, where the bearers in attendance rendered first aid, and advised the sufferer to consult a doctor. [Queensland Times, Ipswich Herald and General Advertiser, Thursday, 29 November 1906, page 9]

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John Lergesner 17/2/1909 – Caledonian (Walloon)
Injured. Fall of stone. Some roof stone fell from two slips and fractured some ribs.
MINING ACCIDENT – While working in the Caledonian Colliery, Walloon, about 1 p.m on 17th February, a collier, John Lercsner, was injured by a fall of stone from the roof of tho workings. The ambulance bearers wore wired for, and, in response to the message, they were soon at the scene of the accident. After rendering temporary assistance, they conveyed the patient to Ipswich Hospital, where he was detained for treatment. The injured man is a resident of Walloon, is married, and is 45 years of age.
[Queensland Times, Thursday, 18 February 1909, page 3]

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Charles George Bailey  26/9/16. – Westvale.
Killed. He was cleaning up a fall, the resulting cavity being full of gas, another fall drove the gas down onto his open light. He was so severely burned by the ensuing explosion that he died in hospital. Son of George Bailey and Mary Ann nee Wilkins.

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William John Hardie  6/08/1920 – Caledonian (Walloon)
Residing in Walloon. Killed. A quantity of stone weighing about 15 cwt. came away from a series of slips in the roof, and falling on Hardie killed him. Son of John Stodart Hardie and Johanna Mary nee Haley.
A MINER KILLED – ACCIDENT AT WALLOON – William Hardie, aged 20 years, was killed at the Caledonian Colliery, Walloon, this morning as the result of being struck by a falling stone The deceased was sitting at the face, when a large stone, about 4ft square, l5in thick, and weighing about 15cwt., slipped from a series of faults, and fell on him, death being instantaneous . Hardie’s mate, a miner named J. List, who was working about three yards away, was not injured. Prior to the fatality the faults from which the stone slipped were not discernible. The deceased’s father (Mr John Hardie) is at present opening up a colliery at Rosewood.
[Brisbane Courier, Saturday, 7 August 1920, page 7]

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Mr. G. Dowe  21/12/20 – Blackheath Colliery
G. Dowe from Rosewood sustained a fracture of the great toe through a fall of stone.

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Hermann Albert Argow  2/051922 – Caledonian (Walloon)
Died 3/05/1922. Son of Mehelm Argow and Agnes nee Meitzel.

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William Pattison 2 /05/1922 – Caledonian (Walloon).
Killed. While engaged in re-timbering an old level in proximity to old workings, a quantity of gas came in contact with their open lights and ignited, severely burning both men. They died as a result of the injuries received 9/05/1922.        Inquiry   

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A. Zandia 4/12/1929 – Westvale
Injured. While holing coal a piece of the stone band in the seam fell and caused a fracture of the shin bone.

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William Melville 13/11/1930 – Ardath
Killed. While bailing water an ignition of petrol which was floating on the top of the water) took place, causing burns to his face, arms and legs, from which he died the following day.

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Herbert Walter Kuss  23/10/1931 – Westvale No 3
Injured. Knelt on a piece of coal at the face, causing an injury to his knee. He died as a result of he wound becoming septic on 3/11/1931.
The death occurred at the Ipswich General Hospital on Tuesday afternoon, of Mr. Herbert Walter Russ, of Rosewood. The late Mr. Kuss, who was 25 years of age, was admitted to the Ipswich Hospital on October 29. suffering from septic poisoning and lung trouble, which developed into double pneumonia. 

He was a son of Mr. and Mrs. A. J. Kuss, of Tallegalla, where he spent his boyhood years. After his marriage to Miss Agnes Coleman, of Rosewood, he made his home in Rosewood. He was engaged in the mining industry for several years, being an employee of Westvale Colliery. Beside his young widow, he leaves two small children. The funeral took place on Wednesday at the Ipswich Cemetery, and was attended by many residents of the Rosewood district. 

The service at the graveside was conducted by Pastor L. Larsen, of the Rosewood Church of Christ, also Rev. Pfeffer, of the Lanefield Baptist Church. Members of the Rosewood P.A.F.S.O.A. (of which the late Mr. Kuss was a member) attended the funeral, the officers present being Bros. F. Lacey (Secretary), Hughes (P.W.M.). J. F. Rea (W.M.), and Brooks. The lodge service was read by Bro. E. C. Stanley, W.D.M. 

Westvale Colliery ceased work on Wednesday, and was largely represented at the funeral. Mr. Victor Kuss, a brother of the deceased, lives at Rosewood.  [Queensland Times, Saturday, 7 November 1931, page 14]

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John Anthony Liddell  5/03/1935 – Rosewood
Injured shoulder. Caused by a fall of stone.

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John Trewick 27/08/1935 – Normanton Colliery
Killed. Caught under an overturned skip.
John Trewick was fatally injured when caught under an overturned skip at the Normanton colliery, Rosewood. He was attending skips which convey the coal from the pithead to the loading stage about a mile distant. A set of skips were being spragged when they broke loose, and rushing down the incline left the line. In an endeavour to stay them, Trewick was caught under the overturning skips. An employee who saw the accident rushed to his assistance, and levered the skip to extricate him, but Trewick was so severely injured that he died in a few minutes. Deceased, who was a native of Wales, was 68 years of age. He had lived in Rosewood for several years. His son, Mr. Syd. Trewick, is part owner and manager of the colliery. Mr. Syd. Trewick was absent in Ipswich at the time. Deceased’s wife and daughter reside at Southport. [Courier-Mail, Wednesday 28 August 1935, page 14]

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A. Zandia  29/07/1937 –  Rosewood
Injured. Foot caused by a fall of stone.

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Sidney Lyle Trewick 15/7/51 – Normanton Colliery (Manager and part-owner.)
Injured. Broke right leg in a fall of coal. This was his second mine accident. The year before he broke his left leg when he fell off a staging at Normanton Colliery, resulting in him having a slight limp from that accident. 

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Herbert Embrey 31/1/52 – United No 7 (Tallegalla)
Killed Instantly. Son of Henry Emrey and Wilhelmine Reinke. Embrey was wheeling a skip at the pit bottom when horses drawing five other skips bolted behind him and crashed on top of him.

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Kevin Maddox 1/9/53 – Mountain View (Rosewood)
Injured. Rope Rider. Fracture of his right foot when it was caught between a skip loaded with stone and the line.

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Ben Hohenhaus  13/01/1954 – Amberfield. 
Injured.
PIT WORKER HURT – Ben Hohenhaus, married, an employee of Amberfield Colliery (Amberley), was admitted to hospital after an accident at the pit yesterday morning. Hohenhaus was cutting pit prop timber on a circular saw when a piece flew back and struck him on the lower part of the body. He was given first aid by ambulance bearers and taken to hospital where his condition yesterday afternoon was stated to be satisfactory.
[Queensland Times, Thursday, 14 January 1954, page 2]

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Michael Crane O’Donnell  7/10/1954 – Lowfield No 2
Killed

Thomas Evans  7/10/1954 – Lowfield No 2
Injured

MAN KILLED BY FALL OF EARTH AT LOWFIELD No. 2 MINE  – Michael Crane O’Donnell, 30, married, Lanefield road, Rosewood, was killed, and Thomas Evans, Albert street, Rosewood, was slightly injured when a fall of earth occurred in an old tunnel at Lowfield No. 2 Colliery, on the Minden Range, about 10 a.m. on Saturday. The men were engaged in removing timbering from a disused tunnel and were working between 30 and 40 yards from the mouth when portion of the roof gave way. Both of the men were covered by the loamy earth, but Evans managed to free himself and frantically removed the debris from his workmate’s head.

“Can you breathe, Mick?” asked Evans, who continued to remove the earth in an attempt to free O’Donnell. 

Soon after O’Donnell had assured his mate that he was alive, a second fall occurred, completely smothering him. Evans rushed for assistance, but time was lost because the nearest telephone is some distance from the mine. 

News of the accident quickly spread to other mines, and it was not long before a crowd of about 100 had gathered to assist in removing the earth. 

In the meantime, Sgt. N. F. Aspinall, stationed at Rosewood, got a team of experienced men together and went to the mine, but by this time the body had been recovered. Artificial respiration was applied until the arrival of the Mines Rescue Squad, under Superintendent M. Crozier, from Booval. Oxygen was ad-ministered, but with no result. 

When Supt. Crozier received word about 10.30 a.m., he added to his party of six rescue workers, four miners who were in the vicinity of the station, and four soldiers who willingly agreed to his suggestion that they should accompany the squad to Rosewood, although they, being strangers, did not have the slightest idea where the mine was located. 

The mine is owned by Mr. W. M. Haenke, of  Ipswich; but it was being worked on tribute by Messrs. E. Petie and Rule Bros. It produces about 80 tons of coal per day.

The body of O’Donnell, who left a widow and one child, was brought to the Ipswich Hospital Morgue on Saturday afternoon by the Mines Rescue party. A post mortem showed that death was due to asphyxia by suffocation. The late Mr. O’Donnell, who was the son of Mr. and Mrs. E. O’Donnell, Lanefield, was buried in the Ipswich Cemetery yesterday, after a service at St. Brigid’s Roman Catholic Church Rosewood. The cortege was one of the largest that has yet passed through Ipswich, and consisted at well over 200 vehicles. Many miners and mine owners were among the mourners for the victim of the first mining disaster in the Rosewood district for about 20 years.

All sections of the business community of Rosewood were represented. It was over 20 min. after the arrival of the coffin at the grave before the burial service, conducted by Father O’Rourke, of Rosewood, began, as it took that time for all the mourners to assemble at the graveside.The Rosewood Citizens’ Band, composed largely of miners, played the hymn, “I Am Praying for You,” at the graveside.
[Queensland Times, Monday, 9 October 1944, page 2]

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Vincent James Hanson  4/12/1947 – Rosewood No 2

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Sidney Lyle Trewick 14/07/1951 – Normanton No. 1 Colliery at Rosewood
Injured by fall of coal and stone       Mining Inquiry

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Albert William Lord 13/06/1952 – Neath Colliery